Exhibition opening: Understanding – Art and Research, MAK, June 27

The Rotting Sounds project has been invited to participate in the exhibition Understanding – Art and Research with a select object of our arts and research practice. We have produced the new object prototype “Reference Tone”, a variation on the existing object “Midnight Song”, exhibited at the Auditorium of Rotting Sounds.

After the opening on June 27 at 7pm, the exhibition will until July 28.

Museum of Applied Arts (MAK)
Stubenring 5, 1010 Wien, Austria

The University of Applied Arts Vienna presents exemplary approaches to its artistic research under the title UNDERSTANDING – ART & RESEARCH, it is about understanding as the very creative impulse. Through examples from research and teaching, science and art the transformation of society can be viewed, examined, sensed, discussed and experienced.
The exhibition UNDERSTANDING – ART & RESEARCH, developed by Gerald Bast, Alexander Damianisch and Barbara Putz-Plecko, now at MAK Vienna had first stations in New Zealand (Dunedin School of Art), Singapore (Nanyang Technological University Singapore), and Los Angeles (UCLA Art|Sci Center).

Digital audio vs. Compact Cassette – performance at the CCNL exhibition, June 13

We are delighted to take part in Wolfgang “Fadi” Dorninger’s exhibition “Cassette Culture Node.Linz” again, this time taking place in Vienna. The exhibition under the theme of “contact, document and exchange” elaborates on the cassette sharing culture having been extremely active in Linz in the 1980s and 90s.

Thomas Grill and Angélica Castelló will perform a multi-part set, combining their individual approaches using compact cassettes and players. Thomas will confront analog tape with digital sounds, using the medium as a transformation apparatus.

Rehearsal – Revisiting compact cassettes (photos by Angélica Castelló)

Printing new 1-bit audio object “Reference Tone”

For the upcoming exhibition UNDERSTANDING ART AND RESEARCH at the Museum of Applied Arts (MAK), we today printed a new prototypical audio object at the Digital Photography Lab at the University of Applied Arts.

It is a variation on the large-scale 1-bit audio print concept, similar to Midnight Song, as exhibited in our Auditorium of Rotting Sounds. Reference Tone represents a 1 kHz -3dBFS sine tone at 44.1 kHz PCM sample rate, converted to a 1-bit DSD encoding with 64-times oversampling.

The director of the lab, Josef Schauer-Schmidinger supervised the printing of the 250 MB programmatically generated PDF file at 150 dpi bit structure size. The printed diameter of 100 cm contains approximately 30 Million bits, equivalent to about 10 seconds of very high quality audio.

Rotting sounds masterclass at Herzen University, St.Petersburg, May 23

The “rotting sounds” researchers Thomas Grill, Till Bovermann and Almut Schilling were invited to conduct a masterclass at the Institute of Music, Theater and Choreography of the Russian State Pedagogical University A.I. Herzen, above all with the students of Andrey Bundin.

After an introductory presentation on the concepts of the research projects, we worked with/on “digital artefacts” that each of the participants brought to the workshop. The focus was on the notion of the “digital trinity”, we have established, consisting of storage material, information content, and interpretation.

Re-interpretation

Buffer Manipulations in Supercollider.

Recording of the live performance “Buffer Manipulation” by LFSaw (Till Bovermann) at the opening of the Auditorium of Rotting Sounds. Includes bonus track.

Circulation / Corruption

Impressions of the workshop at University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna conducted by Martin Howse

Librarian’s Choice, MDW, March 13

Thomas Grill represents the rotting sounds project at the panel discussion “Ungehörtes – Unerhörtes” (unheard – unheard of), featuring archival sound documents of the library of the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna.

March 13, 6pm
University library, reading room
Anton-von-Webern-Platz 1, 1030 Wien

Article in MDW magazine, February 25

The web and print magazine of the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna (MDW) has published an article on the Rotting sounds project.

Link to article

Notes and sketches by Till Bovermann and Almut Schilling

Article in Austrian daily newspaper Der Standard, February 20

Journalist Doris Griesser has authored a nice feature article on the opening of the upcoming “Auditorium of Rotting sounds” for the Austrian daily newspaper Der Standard.

Spannend, was aus diesen wissenschaftlichen Expeditionen erwachsen kann. Vielleicht auch eine neue Ästhetik des Verfalls und des Unperfekten.

Workshop circulation/corruption by Martin Howse, March 28-29

Our team members, psychogeophysicist Martin Howse and media artist Till Bovermann will conduct the workshop Circulation and corruption, examining the various circulations of media through the matters and bodies of the earth and atmosphere, and through a certain corruption or dissolution of (digital) identity, meaning and description.

The workshop is fully booked. Many thanks for your overwhelming interest.

March 28th, 10:00 to 17:30
March 29th, 09:30 to 13:00
Senatssitzungssaal L0123

University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna
Anton-von-Webern-Platz 1, 1030 Wien, Austria

All technology that is derived of earth, must be decomposed and again reduced to earth. [Basil Valentine]

Old earth, no more lies, I’ve seen you, it was me, with my other ravening eyes, too late. [Samuel Beckett]

Within a one and a half day hands-on, speculative workshop we will collectively explore the interfaces and exchanges between living systems (earth, compost, worms, mycelium) and active audio electronics. We will participate primarily with our hands and our ears within circulations amongst earths, composts, mushroom mycelium, moulds, active chemistry, worms, crows, dusts, smokes and fogs and impulses and waves.

During the workshop we will construct a series of open circuits which do not conceal their materiality but participate equally within material and electrochemical exchanges and circulations. These circuits are inspired through a media archaeology of electronic music production, and through the history of alchemical engagement with minerals, with decay and with the earth. These technical and conceptual influences are equally opened to circulation and corruption during the workshop.

We will work with a range of materials (for example, machine cut copper sheets and oyster mushroom mycelium) and approaches (for example, with radio transmission and signal reception) to design and build these open circuits which will enter into processes of appreciable decay, corruption and dissolution. These open circuits will be placed during the workshop in selected interior and exterior locations to participate in various time scales of deterioration and degradation.

No specific technical knowledge is necessary for participation.