Rieseln @ National Park Gesäuse

Exhibition Alte Säge Gstatterboden 2021
Nicole Krenn, Lisa Truttmann, Thomas Grill

Manchmal, auf dem Weg, trifft es aus der Nähe auf das Ohr, unvermittelt, und mit der Kopfbewegung auf das Auge. Eine helle, leichte Bewegung der kleinsten Bestandteile. An Kanten und Flächen, über Formen und Texturen sammeln sich diese Winzigkeiten zu einer beständigen Strömung.

Sometimes, along the way, the ear is hit up close, suddenly, and then also the eye with a movement of the head. A bright, slight movement of the smallest components. On edges and surfaces, over shapes and textures, these tiny things gather to form a constant flow.

This year’s exhibition in the Alte Säge in Gstatterboden is designed by Thomas Grill, Nicole Krenn and Lisa Truttmann. Under the exhibition title “Rieseln” they deal with the forms of erosion that are omnipresent in the national park in a variety of ways. The artists have examined the temporal process of erosion as well as the visual and acoustic phenomena and elaborated them through the media. The architecture of the Alte Säge in Gstatterboden is directly integrated as the environment for these topics. An installation spans a permeable, walk-in room, flowing from ceiling to floor, in which photography and sound are used on various materials – from fine silk to coarse linen, arranged on steel threads. In terms of content and form, these materials connect the exhibition space itself and the thematic landscape of the national park. Detailed recordings in sound and image serve as a reference and source material. These fragments form contrasts between geometric and soft, rigid and flowing, in sound between naturalistic and synthetic – the installation becomes a tangible, lively landscape.

The auditory component consists of 3 vertically stacked layers: From the semi-open attic of the hall, a synthetically generated wind flow can be perceived, swelling and calming with the intensity of the sun’s irradition. Below the wooden floor, a subtle water trickle reminds of the presence of small streams all over the national park. In between those two layers, the space is traversed by an airy arrangement of steel wires, supporting the large textile surfaces and also bearing a total of 12 sound emitters. These are acoustic transducers mounted on small pieces of slate, producing ever changing patterns of tiny clicks, flowing from far overhead to below the floor. Occuring only once in a while, on a very subtle loudness level, the trickling movements provide moments of irritation within the exhibitions’s overall flow of textures and sounds.

Opening times:
May 01–15: Fri–Sun, 10–18h
May 19 through October 31: Tue–Sun (Mon closed), 10-18h
Free admission

Alte Säge Gstatterboden
gegenüber Nationalpark Pavillon
Gstatterboden 25
8913 Gstatterboden
+43 664 8252313

rotting sounds